Disengaged Employees or Under-engaged Employees–Is That You?

Although we still see reports about ongoing layoffs and slow-to-hire employers, occasionally a bright spot appears on the horizon. At least, it’s a potential bright spot for would-be job seekers–such as employees who would have left their current job before now if they thought they could. Two new articles on recruitingtrends.com (a recruiter-focused website) suggest the time is approaching when that might begin to occur. A particular focal point of the articles is individuals who are either disengaged or under-engaged employees. If either of those terms could describe you, these articles could be worth a look.

Low Employee Engagement Causing Employer Concern

According to an article by Scott Erker, Ph.D. (Senior VP, DDI’s Selection Solutions), employee loyalty is fading as the economy regains some stability and baby boomers are poised to retire. Client companies he has talked with are increasingly concerned about the possibility–maybe even likelihood–of losing top employees. He notes that more than one-third of employees could be looking for other jobs, including top performers who have hung in there because of the poor job market but are now seeing the potential for movement. They’re either disengaged or under-engaged employees.

If you’re one of those employees Erker refers to, this could be music to your ears. While it might not give you a really strong upper hand with employers and potential employers, it could at least give you an edge that’s been missing for too long. Obviously, you still want to behave professionally and ethically and conduct a job search campaign that doesn’t cross the line into unacceptable behavior, but that doesn’t preclude taking smart steps to move forward and try to improve your job (and financial) situation.

Senior Leadership and Employee Engagement

The second article, titled “Senior Leadership Key to Improving Dismal Employee Engagement,” cites a 2012 National Norms Survey on employee engagement by Modern Survey. That survey indicates that 67% of employees are disengaged or under-engaged. Actually, the study shows that employee engagement has improved over the past year but is still a long way from great. As Modern Survey president Don Macpherson puts it, “the U.S. workforce reports that they want two things more than anything. They want senior leadership’s clear vision of where their organization is going, and they want the opportunity to personally grow and develop once again. Both of these things have been stunted during the economic malaise of the last few years.”

If any of this strikes a chord with you, it might be a good idea to start assessing your situation carefully and evaluating your options for improving it. Whether the time is right for you now or not, this preparation should enable you to make your move advantageously when it is.

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